Archive for Blue Green Algae

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FollowTheLeaderThank you so much for following this blog about animals and animal communication! I wanted to let you know, however, that I have moved the entire blog to my main website and that is where new posts appear. I hope you will hop on over there to catch up and sign up to follow me at that location. And if you have a blog too, please put that in the comments there so I can check it out. Thanks so much! LetaSignature

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Enhance Your Mental Faculties… and Maybe Your Psychic Powers Too!

The secret is the blood-brain barrier. Sounds like something out of a horror movie, but it’s really a great thing, as you will read below. But first, here’s my personal story about how my own mental faculties and psychic powers were enhanced–within about half an hour. Seriously.

Twenty years ago a friend introduced me to a form of blue-green algae called Aphanizomenon flosaquae (aka “AFA”) by giving me one single capsule of what’s called Omega Sun. Within 30 minutes my whole being responded. I felt like my vibratory frequency (yes, we all have one) had been raised about 100 notches, and my physical energy and mood had been enhanced equally. I felt indescribably happy, almost euphoric. It was also easier than I had ever experienced to “tune in” to the animals I talked to for clients, and to feel and receive other types of information psychically as well. Needless to say, I bought a bottle of Omega Sun and immediately signed up with Simplexity Health (then called Cell Tech) so that I could order more algae any time I wanted, wholesale, and share it with others as well.

So here’s why this amazing substance, especially in the form of Omega Sun, works so well in achieving this effect. And if you don’t want to read all the technical stuff, you can just skip to the last paragraph or two.

The blood-brain barrier is a protective network of blood vessels and cells that filters blood flowing to the brain, thereby shielding the central nervous system from contaminants. So it’s a good thing.

That said, this barrier can also have the effect of keeping out quite a few other things that might be beneficial to the brain, like nutrients in the form of less-than-perfect foods we all consume nowadays, to give just one example. Being the hungriest organ in the body, the brain voraciously desires the nutrients, but unfortunately the fillers or refined aspects of many foods prevent the good stuff from ever reaching it.

Enter Omega Sun.  Omega Sun is a form of blue-green algae known as Aphanizomenon flosaquae, acknowledged to be the oldest complete food on the planet. This particular form, Omega Sun, has had its cell wall removed so that its inner goodness can pass through the blood-brain barrier unimpeded.

I could go on and on about the properties and benefits of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, and how it provides just about every nutrient your body needs, in the form of a living, single-cell, raw food that is highly assimilablebut, in a nutshell:  it used to grow in many fresh water lakes on earth but now flourishes in only one remaining place in Oregon, Upper Klamath Lake, where it is fed by nothing but the sun and 35 feet of volcanic deposits on the bottom of the lake. Simplexity Health Inc., a 25+ year-old company, is dedicated to nothing more than safely harvesting and preserving this amazing food, and is responsible for making it available in several different forms.

Omega Sun is just one of Simplexity’s brainchildren, and is the one that can so easily pass the blood-brain barrier and feed your brain.

This is serious brain food, folks. Really.

So if you are feeling mentally foggy, like your head is stuffed with cotton, or you want to amp up your psychic reception, try Omega Sun. You can order it right HERE, right now. Oh, and also, it may help improve your spirits dramatically if you suffer from depression. I can’t swear to this because depression isn’t one of my monsters. (But hmmm, come to think of it, maybe that’s because I’ve been taking algae for 20 years now.) Anyway, sure is worth a try.

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Here are several more blogs about other forms of this wonderful algae and how it is suited to many other bodily needs, like digestion or arthritis…… and those of your animals as well:

Help for Those Winter Blahs, or… How to Stop Being a Couch Potato

Can Blue-Green Algae Make an Animal Smarter?

How to Get Health Insurance for $40 a Month– When You Can’t Get, Don’t Have, or Can’t Afford Health Insurance

Pound Puppies = Problem Poops

Blue-Green Algae: The Proof is in the Pudding… I Mean the Old Horse

How to Keep Your Chihuahuas & Chiweenies Happy, Healthy, & Wise

 

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How to Get Health Insurance for $40 a Month . . . When you Can’t Afford, Don’t Have, or Can’t Get Health Insurance!

“You have nothing if not your health.”

I don’t know who first said that, but you know just how true that is if you’ve ever had a chronic disease or ongoing pain. Quality of life is everything . . . and unfortunately having health insurance doesn’t ensure it. Only good health does.

If you could get health insurance for $40/mo., would you get it?

Of course you would. Even if it were a stretch, just cutting out a few cups of joe from your favorite gourmet coffee shop every month would cover this amount.

If you can’t get or can’t afford health insurance, you can ensure your good health by:

  • eating healthy food,
  • getting plenty of rest, and, of course,
  • never having any stress.

That’s the supposed formula. And maybe it used to work. But in present day circumstances, especially with the toxins in the environment and food we eat, this formula doesn’t really work any more.

What can you add to this picture that will ensure the best health possible and will improve your quality of life?

Super Blue-Green Algae. For $40 bucks a month. In a convenient one-month’s supply of one-a-day Simplexity “Essentials” packets.

Why Super Blue-Green Algae and not just a multi-vitamin? Because Super Blue-Green Algae is one of the few whole foods you can get these days that is wild-crafted, just as Nature created it, and is a complete organic nutrient in a highly digestible form.

The human body does a completely different thing with food in its natural state than with something man-made, even if from organic ingredients. It does not utilize a Vitamin C capsule like it does an orange. Period. So a vitamin pill is not going to change your health or your life. Super Blue-Green Algae can. Really!

You can read all about Super Blue-Green Algae Essentials HERE,  but the fastest way to get your $40/month health insurance is by going HERE and ordering a one-month supply, in convenient daily packets, of Super Blue-Green Algae, and seeing for yourself how this miraculous, natural food enhances your quality of life. Most people report a noticeable, positive increase in energy and well-being within the first thirty days, many much sooner.

There is a 90-day money-back guarantee on all Super Blue-Green products, so you have nothing to lose. $40 a month, really, can do far more for your health and for your quality of life than having an insurance policy.

Take the 90-day challenge and ensure your health! You’re worth it!

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Live abroad? Super Blue-Green Algae is available to some countries overseas now too. Go HERE for more information.

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Dry Eye Symptoms in Chihuahuas

Well . . . not pretty. Read:  eye infection.

That’s what happened to my precious Frida when I first got wind of the fact that she is a bit prone to the “dry-eye” symptoms that some Chihuahuas exhibit.

Frida - co-pilot of not only my car, but my heart.

Naturally, I was out of town. The first time ever since getting her as a pup, so it was my pet-sitters who had the dubious distinction of getting Frida through what was actually a pretty serious medical event. Three trips to the vet, three prescriptions, drops every two hours, and a week later, and Frida was doing okay and “out of the woods,” as they say, in terms of the safety of her right eye. On the other hand, having me leave her — she, who is glued to my right hip — plus being with new people, plus having to wear a Queen Anne’s collar so she couldn’t scratch her eye ………….. well, you can imagine. She was one sad little puppy.

Frida’s problem began with compications due to our high desert climate: namely wind and dust. Her eye became so dry and irritated that an infection was able to set in, and her eye quit producing tears.

But what I learned from this was that Chihuahuas are prone to dry-eye symptoms (or syndrome), so many of them may have this problem sooner or later. The message being:  Keep a close eye on your Chihuahua’s eyes!!

Fortunately, in our case, Frida recovered beautifully and does not have a chronic syndrome requiring daily eyedrops. I do monitor her eyes for tear production regularly, however, and would recommend doing the same if you have a Chihuahua. Also, I think one reason Frida fared so well through her eye trauma was due to the excellent nutrition she gets, the key factor being Super Blue Green Algae. Every day Frida gets a little raw meat plus high-grade kibble, but also probiotics and micro-nutrients all wrapped up into one — go here to check it out:

  formula.http://www.herbsandanimals.com/simplexityhealth/acidophilus.html

(Order as a “PC” and get a 20% wholesale discount. And actually, in Frida’s case, she splits her capsule with her buddy, Tucker, because she only weighs 5 lbs. so doesnt even need a full capsule! So if you have a small dog, this added “health insurance” is super affordable!)

Having a good balance of healthy flora in the system is known to be the first line of defense in fighting infection, so Frida’s little eye invaders didn’t stand a chance!

BUT! Taking even greater precautions, I ordered these goggles  which Frida now wears on our daily walk/runs (I walk, she runs). These definitely help keep out the wind and dust in those little low-to-the-ground eyes she has! All she needs now is an aviator cap, don’t you think?!

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Hot, Dry, Windy and Smoky (HDWS!!) – How to Help Your Horse Under These Conditions

Some might call it coddling, but I am pulling out all the stops to help my horses get through some of the nastiest summer weather conditions they have ever been exposed to.

In spite of normally idyllic conditions, here in New Mexico (as in many Southwest U.S. areas this summer), we haven’t had a drop of rain in I don’t know how long, and wildfires are literally gobbling up the countryside all around us.

The nearest wildfire, just 30 miles away in the Sangre de Christo Mountains. It broke out yesterday.

We have had several days with zero percent humidity, and the winds are raging with gusts up to 50 mph. So smoke fills the air, and has for a few weeks now, causing sneezing, coughing, runny eyes and bad tempers. At least we can get ourselves and our small animals out of it by coming indoors. But our horses are out in it, for better or worse. 

Unlike the 500 acres they had in Texas — with lots of cover, windbreaks, and a steady creek, my horses are restricted to about eight acres here in NM. Acres made up of juniper and sage … and red dirt and sand that the wind flings mercilessly in their eyes when it’s blowing like it is now. Don’t get me wrong, I wouldn’t go back because I can no longer take the extreme heat and humidity of Texas. And I don’t think the horses would either. But everything’s a trade-off, so helping them through such harsh conditions as we are experiencing now in N.M.  is at the top of my priority list these days.

Our New Mexico "pasture." Pretty, but very arid, and obviously this picture was not taken during the current conditions!

Here’s what I do for HDWS (hot, dry, windy & smoky).  And it’s paying off. My horses are happy and in great condition. So if you’re distressed about summer conditions where you live (even if you don’t have all four of HDWS), you might want to try some of these tips yourself.

1. Feed the horses behind shelter from the wind. Mine have a run-in barn — smaller than the one in Texas but it’s a great wind block. Normally I like to spread my horses’ hay out and about in their eight acres, so that they have to move a lot to find it. But when conditions are as they are now, the more protection I can provide, the better.

2. Keep fly masks on 24/7 whenever it’s windy, so that dirt and sand can’t blow in your horses’ eyes and irritate, or worse, cause infection or scar a cornea.

3. Amp up nutrition. I use electrolytes (to keep them drinking plenty of water), anti-oxidants, bran (if I feel the dry conditions are starting to plug them up), free-choice minerals from Advanced Biological Concepts, and probiotics, to name just a few. My personal choice for super foods for my horses are the algae-based products sold through Simplexity Health Products, but whatever products you like and have had good luck with, be sure you plug them in NOW. And I recommend a good, wet, sloppy mash at least once a day (whatever the ingredients).

4. Make sure you provide a salt block and a mineral block. Always. That’s just basic!

5. If flies and mosquitos are a problem (which they usually are NOT when the wind is blowing gale force), definitely find a good fly spray, masks and/or sheets to help your horses out. The last thing they need is huge itchy, scratchy welts on top of HDWS!

6. RINSE OR SOAK YOUR HORSES’ HAY! I think this is one of the most important things you can do, as wet hay gives your horses a cool, damp breath every time they inhale while chewing. When things are at their worst, as they are right now, I spread about half my horses’ hay rations out in a long, shallow trough (with drainage) and distribute the rest among small-holed hay nets, which I can hang under shelter or behind wind blocks. I hose everything down liberally, until it’s dripping wet. And, not surprisingly, lots of the water I see draining out from the hay is quite dirty — no doubt dust from dirt or smoke particles that have lodged in my hay stores. Whatever it is, I’m glad it’s out. And my horses seem to love the wet hay too.

Small-holed hay net (you can find these online). Picture this dripping wet.

7. Hose down your horses whenever it’s too hot, their fly spray has gunked up on them, or the dust has made them into a dirt ball. Heck, hose yourself down at the same time! Spray the hose up in the air so it falls on them like rain — they love that!! (Well, some do….)

8. Oh, and don’t work your horse too much under these conditions. Some of the smoke particulates are microscopic and can lodge in the lungs, causing damage. And some horses have weaker lungs than others — like one of my mares — so do them a favor and take every precaution. This point I got from an equine veterinarian.

All I can say, as we get through this trying time, is:  God bless the firefighters! And, please God, bring us rain!

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I know I have a few followers in the UK, so as I write this post I am thinking:  “Egads! What must my buddies in England be thinking about the horrible conditions over here!!!???” I know this post isn’t helpful for you UK horse lovers, what with your gorgeous green and lush countryside, but, even though we are experiencing just AWFUL conditions here right now, I KNOW you would love New Mexico. In fact I have family from Bath arriving any day now, and this is their favorite place to be, ever. They would all move here in a heartbeat if they could. So don’t give up on us! And thanks for reading my posts! Happy summer to you!

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Pound Puppies = Problem Poops

This is just another way of saying:

  • Rescue dogs usually have upset tummies. Or . . .
  • Shelter dogs have digestive problems. Or . . .
  • Yuk! What’s wrong with my new dog?!

Any way you want to put it, this fact is usually paramount for the dog or puppy you bring away from a shelter or rescue situation. Same goes for cats, kitties, and horses. Why?

If this looks stressful to you, just think what it feels like to him.

Stress. Poor nutrition, possibly even starvation. Emotional anxiety. Grief. Any or all of the above, and more, often plague the rescue while on the streets or in the shelter. They’ve lost their families, or been abandoned, are totally confused and trying to figure out where in the world they are.

This has recently been brought to my attention once again by the arrival of ‘Bear,’ an unspayed, year-old Great Pyrenees female I rescued from the animal shelter 12 days ago. Meet Bear, my number six (yes count them, SIX) dog:

Bear at the shelter. Stay tuned for a follow-up picture and report soon!

Bear was picked up at the landfill in Taos, NM, pretty bedraggled, and then spent a few weeks behind bars being evaluated for aggression (emotional stress) before being spayed and put up for adoption. I heard about her and did a ‘meet & greet’ with two of my other dogs, and listened to her and to my heart about her disposition. I approved, she approved, and my other dogs approved. So she was immediately spayed and home with me the next day.

All is well, and Bear is the perfect ‘peaceable kingdom’ candidate already, just two weeks in. But she came home ravenously hungry 24/7 and burping all day every day. She was underweight, her stool loose, her coat rough and matted.

Chiweenie Tucker now, hale and hardy.

Ah, yes. Shades of my last rescue experience two years ago — bringing little Chiweenie Tucker home from the shelter. Tucker, who now weighs in at 18 lbs., was only two-thirds of that weight when I got him, and his diarrhea was so bad we feared for the worst.

Or Hank, the 29-year-old Quarter Horse I rescued from starvation several years ago. His was a very extreme case and required a carefully orchestrated re-introduction of food and supplements  into his life.

Some of my particular ways of rehabbing rescues include top quality food (I use Flint River for the pre-prepared part of my dogs’ and cats’ diets), Simplexity’s  Super Blue-Green Algae products, especially probiotics to replenish their depleted natural resources, and the herb powdered Slippery Elm (the inner bark) to soothe their highly irritated digestive tracts. There are different variations of these nutritional elements, and other things I use as well, but everybody who comes in as a rescue gets very, very special food and care until they are back to balance. As an example, you can read about Tucker’s special diet HERE.

Just be prepared if you rescue an animal. Don’t expect them to be the picture of health and perfectly well adjusted the moment they come to their new home. Give them time, love, and attention. Just grit your teeth, start brushing out the mats or bathing out the dirt, and customize your new animal’s diet and exercise program. You can bring them all the way back and make them gloriously beautiful, healthy, and happy. They never forget and are grateful to you forever for it.

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READ MORE ABOUT WHY PROBIOTICS ARE SO IMPORTANT FOR A HEALTHY IMMUNE SYSTEM AND DIGESTIVE TRACT HERE.

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Horse Sarcoid Treatment: Excuse Me, Did You Say TOOTHPASTE?!

Guinea Pig Lopeh, when she first came to me 6 months ago.

I’m going to be a guinea pig. Or rather, Lopeh, my little Quarter Horse mare, is going to be a guinea pig.

Lopeh has what I am pretty sure is a sarcoid on her jaw and I’m going to experiment with a remedy I heard about years ago that someone said absolutely positively cured sarcoids. Crest Toothpaste, applied externally, right on the sarcoid.

Yeah, I know. Sounds pretty weird. But I’m into home remedies, and this one is obviously quite harmless, so I’m game to try it.

I’ve never had a horse with sarcoids before so I’ve been researching them a bit online. Here’s a bit of what I found, but I make no claims that this is all accurate information.

One Type of Sarcoid

  • Equine sarcoids are slow growing, locally invasive masses.
  • A virus similar to the papilloma virus in cattle is suspected as the cause, but this is not definitive.
  • Sarcoids CAN run in equine families, so there may be a genetic predisposition involved.
  • Sarcoids usually occur in younger horses (7 or younger).
  • Sarcoids often occur in areas that have been injured or irritated.
  • Sarcoids are often linked to a weakened immune system.
  • Definitive diagnosis must be done by analyzing the sarcoid tissue under a microscope.
  • There are several types of sarcoids, identified according to gross and microscopic appearance. Some sarcoids may look like warts; these solid roundish lumps are called the verrucous type and are distinguished from the fibroblastic type and the flat type. The fibroblastic type looks like proud flesh (granulation tissue) and frequently the tumor mass will have an ulcer on top of it. The flat-type sarcoids are ring-shaped, are not significantly raised, and tend to be scaly and crusty. A combination or transition type exists composed of the verrucous and fibroblastic types.
  • Treatment of sarcoids varies widely and includes surgical excision, cryotherapy, laser excision, immunotherapy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Crest Toothpaste is not mentioned, but hey, why not try it since no one method thus far employed has been consistently more successful in treating equine sarcoids than the others.

I think it’s high time someone did try this Crest home remedy thing, and I am more than happy to offer up Lopeh as the test case. Her sarcoid — or what I think is a sarcoid — is in a spot where a halter or bridle certainly could have rubbed or irritated her jaw, so its location alone makes it highly suspect.

Lopeh and Her Sarcoid

Also, Lopeh came to me after 3 or 4 years of living virtually wild in a breeding herd on a large ranch where she birthed at least 3 foals during that time. She was extremely stressed out and fearful emotionally, had two babies by her side and had been nursing constantly for those years,  so I know her immune system was terribly weakened.

In the six months I’ve had her, Lopeh has mellowed out dramatically. I have also been working hard on strengthening her immune system by feeding her lots of Super Blue Green Algae, focusing on probiotics and anti-oxidants.

But now I think it is time to add one more ingredient to her health regimen. Crest Toothpaste, extermally, for her sarcoid.

I will start in the next day or two (as soon as I can go buy some) and will report back in a few weeks or months.

NOTE:   It is now January 1st, 2012, and I have had so much interest in this topic that I have set it up on my Facebook fan page so folks can more easily chat back and forth about what they’re using and what’s working there. If you would like to do that, ust go HERE to check it out! And thanks, everybody, for your posts and your ideas!

 

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