Archive for Health & Healing

Hello, Blog Followers!

FollowTheLeaderThank you so much for following this blog about animals and animal communication! I wanted to let you know, however, that I have moved the entire blog to my main website and that is where new posts appear. I hope you will hop on over there to catch up and sign up to follow me at that location. And if you have a blog too, please put that in the comments there so I can check it out. Thanks so much! LetaSignature

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How to Diagnose Horse Ulcers

This is a SUPER video on diagnosing whether or not your horse has ulcers.

Equine Ulcer Diagnosis by Mark dePaolo, DVM

If you have a horse who is cinchy/grouchy/touchy/spooky/rears/kicks/bites/bucks, or shows any sign of evasive, aggressive, or uncomfortable behavior, do not pass ‘go’ before you watch this video. You’ll want to get out your pen and pad and take notes. This is a short video, and the technique Dr. dePaolo recommends looks easy enough for anyone to follow. Thank you, Dr. Madalyn Ward, DVM (who specializes in holistic horse care), for bringing this to my attention so I could share it with others. Be sure and check out both her and Dr. DePaolo’s websites for more great tips on natural horse care.

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EPSM, aka PSSM, aka Equine Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy – If Your Horse Ties Up or Has Other Muscular Problems It Could Be PSSM

Unfortunately, I think my Quarter Horse mare, Corazon, has this disease. And yes, it is classified as a disease and in some cases can be fatal. It afflicts mainly draft horses, warmbloods, Arabians, and, alas, the American Quarter Horse. I’ve had Corazon less than two years, and she has always had body problems, stiffness, and a resistance to moving out–even to the point of bucking when asked to canter. Her muscles also “waste”, or atrophy, quickly if she’s undernourished or can’t move enough. I’ve been doing all sorts of things to help her (including body work), and not asking too much when riding her, but when her right rear leg recently developed a pronounced “hitch,” I sought the advice of my dear friend and holistic equine veterinarian in Texas, Dr. Madalyn Ward, and she said it sounded like EPSM. (Sob!) Dr. Ward has a Quarter Horse who she suspects may also have EPSM, so she has been paying a lot of attention to this disease lately. Her horse “ties up,” which Corazon does not, but there are many other symptoms of EPSM. The following is a guest post from Dr. Ward on how to recognize the signs of and treat this insidious, often-unrecognized disease. So far the only way a definitive diagnosis can be obtained is from a muscle biopsy. Treatment is mainly through diet. If you have a horse exhibiting any of these problems, who just can’t seem to get through them, I hope this guest article from Dr. Ward will be helpful. Although this article focuses mainly on the symptom of “tying up,” treatment is the same for all EPSM symptoms. My thanks to Dr. Ward for sharing this information.

Corazon, after a recent body work treatment that we hope is making her more comfortable.

“Tying up” is one of the most common muscular problems in performance horses, although this condition can also occur in lightly-worked horses.

Signs of acute tying up are very obvious and include:
– anxiety
– refusal to move
– swelling in muscles of the hindquarters

Chronic symptoms include:
– abnormal hind leg gaits
– exercise intolerance
– muscle wasting
– back soreness
– difficulty lifting hind legs
– behavior problems under saddle
– spasmodic type colic
– elusive lameness or behavior problems

EPSM and Horses Tying Up:
Equine polysaccharide storage myopathy (EPSM) is by far the most common cause of tying up in horses. EPSM has been around for years but now it is being recognized earlier and diagnosed much more frequently. For years I have attempted to treat frustrating cases of tying up. I now realize how many of those horses probably had EPSM, and wish I had known more about it sooner.

EPSM is a genetic disorder that affects a horse’s carbohydrate metabolism. Affected horses store too much glycogen in their muscles, which they cannot break down to produce carbohydrates. Without these carbohydrates as energy sources, these muscles lack the necessary fuel during exercise. As a result the muscles must use energy from less efficient energy pathways, which produces damaging byproducts, such as lactic acid.

Conventional Treatment of Tying Up:
Conventional treatment of acute episodes of tying up includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sedatives, and fluids if muscle damage is severe. Signs of severe damage would include muscle swelling, heat, and pain on palpation. The horse’s urine might also turn dark since the pigment from damaged muscles passes through the bloodstream.

Holistic Treatment of Tying Up:
Holistic support for acute episodes of tying up includes giving the homeopathic remedy Arnica every 5 to 10 minutes until the horse is relaxed and able to move. Gentle body work such as TTEAM, Bowen, or Equine Touch can bring more circulation to the tight muscles. Rescue Remedy can be used to help the horse relax.

Early Recognition of EPSM:
Early recognition of the symptoms of EPSM will allow you to take steps to manage the horse so that tying up never happens. Arabians, Quarter Horses and Warmbloods are the most commonly-affected breeds, but any horse with chronic back soreness or unexplained hind limb lameness should be considered for EPSM. A muscle biopsy can confirm the condition, but often a horse’s response to diet and management changes will provide a good indicator. Horses with EPSM should not be confined to a stall. Movement is very important. A low starch, high fat and fiber diet is also critical for controlling the symptoms. Some mildly affected horses will respond to a formulated low starch feed and mixed alfalfa/grass hay. Others will need much higher fat levels–up to 20% of the overall diet.
Conventional wisdom suggests vegetable oil as the best source of fat for horses that require higher levels of this nutrient. I do not like vegetable oil because it is almost always highly processed and refined. Vegetable oil is also lacking in vitamins or minerals, so these must then also be supplemented to meet the needs of the horse. I prefer a low starch feed and a grass/alfalfa hay mix that is supplemented with high fat seeds such as flax, chia and/or sunflower. The seeds are much more natural to the horse’s diet and include other nutrients to meet the horses overall needs. Extruded rice bran that has added minerals can also be used as a fat source. If none of these diet plans bring the fat content high enough to control symptoms, then vegetable oil can be used up to 2 cups a day. Additional antioxidants such as coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, and selenium can help the horse more readily heal the damage to his muscles.

What to Expect:

Response to the low starch, high fat diet will take about 4 months, so you must be patient even if symptoms don’t appear immediately better. Signs of improvement include re-bulking of atrophied muscles, comfort when hind legs are raised, and freer movement of the hind end in general. Many EPSM horses will appear to have much higher energy on the new diet and this is mainly due to freedom from chronic muscle spasm.

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Overcoming Fear and Pain in a Horse

This is something that is definitely easier said than done. And often people, even horse people, mistake fear or pain for defiance and meanness.



When I talked to this little girl a few days ago, it was hard to even get her to open up at first. She was very mistrusting and fearful, so having someone start talking to her who she couldn’t see was a pretty scary thing. She never did reveal her true, underlying personality because she was “flat” emotionally from her past experiences and dealings with humans. But she did show me lots of mental pictures and convey lots of feelings and ideas about why she behaves as she does.

I was called in to talk to this four-year-old filly because she spooked, shied, bolted, and bit—to the extreme. She had been bought from two “horse traders” not too many months ago, as a three-year-old who had been started at two, and nothing more was known about her background. Her new owner was very badly injured in an accident soon after getting her, when the filly spooked and bolted out from under her. She’d been hand-walked ever since (2-1/2 hours a day), but exhibited the same behavior even then, plus was now biting at her owner while they walked.

Not a pretty picture. Her owner was understandably afraid to ride her again, and was getting shoved and knocked around considerably by the filly during their walks. Both owner and horse were now afraid, so the filly had no strong leader to trust—a must in a horse’s natural life.

A four-year-old is still basically a baby horse, and if they’ve had a rough start like this girl, that young age is doubly stacked against them. This filly did show me that she had once been a normal, happy, frolicking foal, which gave me hope that that basic personality could still be resurrected. She showed me a traumatic weaning, very rough handling, and that she had extreme pain and restriction in her neck, which seemed to cut off neurological and circulatory function to the extent that her peripheral vision was restricted. So things coming into her vision “from the wrong place,” suddenly and unexpectedly, caused much of her spooking. Horses, being prey animals, can see peripherally almost all the way behind them, and that’s where predators come from. So it’s no wonder she freaked out all the time. And she said she was biting because her head was being jerked on, and it hurt!

Her owner, who had never consulted with an animal communicator before, and who was a novice horse-person, wanted me to explain things to the filly and simply tell her how she needed to behave. Unfortunately, it’s not that simple, though many people think it must be. It is assumed that if you can talk to an animal, you can just tell them what to do, how to be, not to be afraid, etc. No. You can’t override fear or pain via intellectual explanation. I have a bad back, and if someone told me to simply ignore the pain and carry on normally when I’m in the middle of an extreme episode, I would think they were both nuts and lacking compassion. I think it’s the same with animals. They might hear us tell them “everything is okay,” but until we can provide concrete help that engenders trust and relief, no change will occur.

For this baby I recommended much shorter walks in-hand, a non-invasive technique of body work called Ortho-Bionomy, and trainer Carolyn Resnick’s at-liberty approach designed to appeal to a horse in the horse’s own “language,” thereby building trust and confidence in both horse and owner.

When I have a session like this, no matter how detached and emotionally clear I try to stay, it always pains me to have to sign off, knowing that things could go either way. Sometimes I get feedback later; sometimes I don’t. And horses like this filly, who are in a state of pain and mistrust, are dangerous animals who often end up being passed around and suffering more and more abuse due to lack of understanding.

I hope and pray in this case that this little girl gets the help she needs, and that her human companions won’t continue to write off her behavior as intentional aggression.

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Enhance Your Mental Faculties… and Maybe Your Psychic Powers Too!

The secret is the blood-brain barrier. Sounds like something out of a horror movie, but it’s really a great thing, as you will read below. But first, here’s my personal story about how my own mental faculties and psychic powers were enhanced–within about half an hour. Seriously.

Twenty years ago a friend introduced me to a form of blue-green algae called Aphanizomenon flosaquae (aka “AFA”) by giving me one single capsule of what’s called Omega Sun. Within 30 minutes my whole being responded. I felt like my vibratory frequency (yes, we all have one) had been raised about 100 notches, and my physical energy and mood had been enhanced equally. I felt indescribably happy, almost euphoric. It was also easier than I had ever experienced to “tune in” to the animals I talked to for clients, and to feel and receive other types of information psychically as well. Needless to say, I bought a bottle of Omega Sun and immediately signed up with Simplexity Health (then called Cell Tech) so that I could order more algae any time I wanted, wholesale, and share it with others as well.

So here’s why this amazing substance, especially in the form of Omega Sun, works so well in achieving this effect. And if you don’t want to read all the technical stuff, you can just skip to the last paragraph or two.

The blood-brain barrier is a protective network of blood vessels and cells that filters blood flowing to the brain, thereby shielding the central nervous system from contaminants. So it’s a good thing.

That said, this barrier can also have the effect of keeping out quite a few other things that might be beneficial to the brain, like nutrients in the form of less-than-perfect foods we all consume nowadays, to give just one example. Being the hungriest organ in the body, the brain voraciously desires the nutrients, but unfortunately the fillers or refined aspects of many foods prevent the good stuff from ever reaching it.

Enter Omega Sun.  Omega Sun is a form of blue-green algae known as Aphanizomenon flosaquae, acknowledged to be the oldest complete food on the planet. This particular form, Omega Sun, has had its cell wall removed so that its inner goodness can pass through the blood-brain barrier unimpeded.

I could go on and on about the properties and benefits of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, and how it provides just about every nutrient your body needs, in the form of a living, single-cell, raw food that is highly assimilablebut, in a nutshell:  it used to grow in many fresh water lakes on earth but now flourishes in only one remaining place in Oregon, Upper Klamath Lake, where it is fed by nothing but the sun and 35 feet of volcanic deposits on the bottom of the lake. Simplexity Health Inc., a 25+ year-old company, is dedicated to nothing more than safely harvesting and preserving this amazing food, and is responsible for making it available in several different forms.

Omega Sun is just one of Simplexity’s brainchildren, and is the one that can so easily pass the blood-brain barrier and feed your brain.

This is serious brain food, folks. Really.

So if you are feeling mentally foggy, like your head is stuffed with cotton, or you want to amp up your psychic reception, try Omega Sun. You can order it right HERE, right now. Oh, and also, it may help improve your spirits dramatically if you suffer from depression. I can’t swear to this because depression isn’t one of my monsters. (But hmmm, come to think of it, maybe that’s because I’ve been taking algae for 20 years now.) Anyway, sure is worth a try.

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Here are several more blogs about other forms of this wonderful algae and how it is suited to many other bodily needs, like digestion or arthritis…… and those of your animals as well:

Help for Those Winter Blahs, or… How to Stop Being a Couch Potato

Can Blue-Green Algae Make an Animal Smarter?

How to Get Health Insurance for $40 a Month– When You Can’t Get, Don’t Have, or Can’t Afford Health Insurance

Pound Puppies = Problem Poops

Blue-Green Algae: The Proof is in the Pudding… I Mean the Old Horse

How to Keep Your Chihuahuas & Chiweenies Happy, Healthy, & Wise

 

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How to Get Health Insurance for $40 a Month . . . When you Can’t Afford, Don’t Have, or Can’t Get Health Insurance!

“You have nothing if not your health.”

I don’t know who first said that, but you know just how true that is if you’ve ever had a chronic disease or ongoing pain. Quality of life is everything . . . and unfortunately having health insurance doesn’t ensure it. Only good health does.

If you could get health insurance for $40/mo., would you get it?

Of course you would. Even if it were a stretch, just cutting out a few cups of joe from your favorite gourmet coffee shop every month would cover this amount.

If you can’t get or can’t afford health insurance, you can ensure your good health by:

  • eating healthy food,
  • getting plenty of rest, and, of course,
  • never having any stress.

That’s the supposed formula. And maybe it used to work. But in present day circumstances, especially with the toxins in the environment and food we eat, this formula doesn’t really work any more.

What can you add to this picture that will ensure the best health possible and will improve your quality of life?

Super Blue-Green Algae. For $40 bucks a month. In a convenient one-month’s supply of one-a-day Simplexity “Essentials” packets.

Why Super Blue-Green Algae and not just a multi-vitamin? Because Super Blue-Green Algae is one of the few whole foods you can get these days that is wild-crafted, just as Nature created it, and is a complete organic nutrient in a highly digestible form.

The human body does a completely different thing with food in its natural state than with something man-made, even if from organic ingredients. It does not utilize a Vitamin C capsule like it does an orange. Period. So a vitamin pill is not going to change your health or your life. Super Blue-Green Algae can. Really!

You can read all about Super Blue-Green Algae Essentials HERE,  but the fastest way to get your $40/month health insurance is by going HERE and ordering a one-month supply, in convenient daily packets, of Super Blue-Green Algae, and seeing for yourself how this miraculous, natural food enhances your quality of life. Most people report a noticeable, positive increase in energy and well-being within the first thirty days, many much sooner.

There is a 90-day money-back guarantee on all Super Blue-Green products, so you have nothing to lose. $40 a month, really, can do far more for your health and for your quality of life than having an insurance policy.

Take the 90-day challenge and ensure your health! You’re worth it!

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Live abroad? Super Blue-Green Algae is available to some countries overseas now too. Go HERE for more information.

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Dry Eye Symptoms in Chihuahuas

Well . . . not pretty. Read:  eye infection.

That’s what happened to my precious Frida when I first got wind of the fact that she is a bit prone to the “dry-eye” symptoms that some Chihuahuas exhibit.

Frida - co-pilot of not only my car, but my heart.

Naturally, I was out of town. The first time ever since getting her as a pup, so it was my pet-sitters who had the dubious distinction of getting Frida through what was actually a pretty serious medical event. Three trips to the vet, three prescriptions, drops every two hours, and a week later, and Frida was doing okay and “out of the woods,” as they say, in terms of the safety of her right eye. On the other hand, having me leave her — she, who is glued to my right hip — plus being with new people, plus having to wear a Queen Anne’s collar so she couldn’t scratch her eye ………….. well, you can imagine. She was one sad little puppy.

Frida’s problem began with compications due to our high desert climate: namely wind and dust. Her eye became so dry and irritated that an infection was able to set in, and her eye quit producing tears.

But what I learned from this was that Chihuahuas are prone to dry-eye symptoms (or syndrome), so many of them may have this problem sooner or later. The message being:  Keep a close eye on your Chihuahua’s eyes!!

Fortunately, in our case, Frida recovered beautifully and does not have a chronic syndrome requiring daily eyedrops. I do monitor her eyes for tear production regularly, however, and would recommend doing the same if you have a Chihuahua. Also, I think one reason Frida fared so well through her eye trauma was due to the excellent nutrition she gets, the key factor being Super Blue Green Algae. Every day Frida gets a little raw meat plus high-grade kibble, but also probiotics and micro-nutrients all wrapped up into one — go here to check it out:

  formula.http://www.herbsandanimals.com/simplexityhealth/acidophilus.html

(Order as a “PC” and get a 20% wholesale discount. And actually, in Frida’s case, she splits her capsule with her buddy, Tucker, because she only weighs 5 lbs. so doesnt even need a full capsule! So if you have a small dog, this added “health insurance” is super affordable!)

Having a good balance of healthy flora in the system is known to be the first line of defense in fighting infection, so Frida’s little eye invaders didn’t stand a chance!

BUT! Taking even greater precautions, I ordered these goggles  which Frida now wears on our daily walk/runs (I walk, she runs). These definitely help keep out the wind and dust in those little low-to-the-ground eyes she has! All she needs now is an aviator cap, don’t you think?!

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Riding With a Bad Back

 

My riding boots. Can you guess which leg I ride with? Can you imagine how much attention and care it must take for a horse to adapt to a one-sided rider? Poor Bella!

I was cleaning house today and as I was moving these riding boots (pictured left) in order to sweep under them, I was shocked to notice the difference in “dirt pattern” on them. Notice the right boot has dirt and horse sweat  ground into the calf whereas the left boot shows none in this area.

I just stood there staring, This really brought home for me what I have been living with for at least the last 5 or 6 years, probably longer, and got me to wondering how it must have affected Bella, my main steady mount for all those years. As recently as 3-1/2 years ago I realized something must be wrong, because the back of my saddle always slipped to the right plus I had a lot of body pain while riding. Then I had a bad slip and fall not quite 3 years ago (not horse related) that took things over the edge.

What I learned from x-rays, due to complications from that fall, was that I not only had damaged nerves and discs, but a very marked curvature of the spine (scoliosis) which was no doubt at the seat of the earlier problems I had been noticing way before the fall. Other x-rays showed my right leg is anatomically shorter than my left. Not much, but a bit . . . and every little bit counts in body balance.

Me and my steady mount, Bella, during one of our 10-minute rides after my fall.

It took me quite a while to get back in the saddle after my fall. Oh I would get on, but after 5 or 10 minutes I was hurting so bad I had to get off. But I really, really wanted to be able to ride again, both in the ring and out on the trail.

So a year ago, when I heard about a certain therapeutic riding instructor in my area, Christina Savitsky, I had one of those magical ‘aha’ moments where you just “know” something is right — that she was the person who could help me ride again.

I called Christina, and the story gets better from that point on. She arrived on that first day with a big smile on her face, a huge cowboy hat on her head to shade her lovely face from our intense New Mexico sun, and an adorable 15-month-old hanging onto her back like a baby monkey. Before mounting up we started talking, and I told her what had happened: the fall, the scoliosis, etc., and before I could even get half of it out she said, “I can see it.” I said, “What?” She said, “I already saw it, when you had your back to me.” I was impressed.

Christina, schooling me in the ring in one our first sessions together, with little Mesa Ray hanging off her back.

Christina already had years under her belt of helping people like me, many with much worse conditions, so as far as she was concerned I was “not a problem.” We got me up on the horse and she began instructing me, gently and positively, in how to reposition my pelvis and back so as to sit in a more comfortable position. She also raised my stirrups so far up that I felt like I was sitting in a rocking chair (and kinda silly . . . but that takes pressure off the lower back, my problem area). 

I can ride an hour and a half now (haven’t tested longer), and I give all the credit to Christina. And I hope to do much more in the coming year or two.

I guess the message here — if anyone else with body problems is reading this blog — is to seek help. Don’t be shy or self-conscious. There are millions of people like us who have such problems! Find a kind someone who has experience and understands your problems and can help you “adjust” your body in such a way as to be successful in the saddle once again. Though I still am not a heavy rider as compared with most, and I ride only for pleasure, I am so very thankful I found the one angel disguised as a therapeutic-riding-instructor-cowgirl who could help me, Leta, get back to what I love so much!

So to all of you with pain and body problems:    Find your own riding angel!  He or she is out there!

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If you enjoyed this post and would like to read more about Christina and what makes a good riding instructor, go HERE!

 

 

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The Polite Way to Colic (If You Are a Horse)

1.  At dinner, eat very slowly — very. And do not lick your plate like you usually do. This should give them the first hint that something is not as it should be.

2.  At breakfast, eat a couple of bites … very slowly, then leave the rest. This should definitely get some attention.

3.  Maintain a somewhat worried look in your eye. This should also help tip someone off that you are feeling kind of puny.

4.  After breakfast do not rush off to the pasture after your herd-mates. Instead, walk very slowly with your head down. Don’t get worked up. Don’t breathe faster than normal or act weird.

5.  Stand around in the pasture and act like you’re trying to eat hay, but you’re really not.

6.  Try to cooperate and move only a little bit when your person pokes you in the butt with something small and hard and holds it there for 2 or 3 minutes. The good thing about this is that it allows you to pass a little gas, which feels really good so you lick and chew a little. And you know she always likes to see you lick and chew, so you are happy this pleases her.

7.  Stand very, very still while she attaches the side of her head to the side of your body for a long time, and then does the same thing on the other side of your body. Even if you don’t know what she’s doing, be very careful not to move. And your stomach is VERY still and quiet, so you know that won’t disturb her.

8.  Go very quietly with your person into whatever area she wants to put you in for “observation” and “treatment.”

9.  Be cooperative and stand still while she administers things in your mouth. One of them sounds like “vomit,” one like “chami…” something, one tastes like liquid grass, and one is gummy and pasty and not quite as nice as the others.

10.  Also try to stand still while your person pulls on your ears, kind of hard, and does funny little massage things all around them and also back by your rump, AND, ahem, RIGHT under your tail, which apparently is a spot that has something to do with making you feel better.

11.  Ignore your roomies who are standing around staring at you, wondering what is going on. Do not act panicky because you are not with them or try to rush over to be let out with them.

12.  Be patient. Your person may come and go for a while and you may be left to your own devices for a few minutes at a time. Do not get upset. Do not get dramatic. And Heaven forbid and above all, do NOT throw yourself down on the ground and start rolling!

13.  Always mind your manners. Be a lady. Or a gentleman.

14.  Lastly, deposit a very small pile of dry manure in your confinement area. This seems to signify some major milestone. Your person acts thrilled and loves you up, and since you always like to please her, this makes you happy. And you feel better now too!

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My new mare, Corazon, colicked today and, in all my years of observing and treating colic, her manner and mode of doing so were completely new to me. I would never have suspected colic except that I knew her stoic personality so proceeded through my usual steps. Using homeopathics (Nux vomica and Chamomile), along with probiotics and body work on helpful acupressure points (including, ahem, the anus) has always done the trick for me for mild gas or impaction colic. But the lesson learned today: Certain horse personality types may not show you they’re colicking in the way most horses will. Check out how different they can be at my friend Dr. Madalyn Ward’s horse personality website.  I am grateful to my dear Corazon for teaching me yet another new lesson in the horsey realm. She is indeed the equine epitome of a lady!

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Ever Fascinating — Horse Personality Types!

I realize a study of horse personality types is not “ever fascinating” to everyone. But, being a horse nut, it is to me. And if you share my passion, then read on.

I have two mares, both coming 10:

Bella, a Mustang from a wild herd with lots of Percheron genes threaded in. I’ve had Bella almost 6 years.

Bella (left) & Corazon

Corazon, a Quarter Horse with a ranch horse heritage as long as your arm. I’ve had Corazon for 6 months.

Both girls are gentle, mellow spirits. I chose each largely for this reason, as I am past the days of wild-west riding and roping and need sound, steady mounts now instead. They are similar in many other ways too: body type (large and chunky), tastes (both are foodies), and manageability (easy-peasey to be around on the ground). They are also both made of of the same two elements when I type them using Dr. Madalyn Ward’s Five-Element Personality Typing System (based on ancient Traditional Chinese Medicine).

Madalyn Ward, DVM, has spent years developing her system, and is one of the major horse  proponents in our country who stresses that horses have different personalities and constitutional types, just like we do, and that they therefore respond differently to food, training, and environment. So “a rose is a rose” does not apply in the horse world (nor the dog, cat, people, or other world).

My Bella is what’s called a Tai Yin (an Earth/Metal combination). Corazon is what’s called a Yang Ming (a Metal/Earth combination). Being so similar in disposition and body type, and sharing the same two elements, one would think they would be very close in personality. But they are not. (You can read a brief description of each of these types HERE.)

I know Bella like the back of my hand, but I am still getting to know Corazon and realized quite some time ago that she is totally different from Bella in many ways.

Bella considers herself my equal. We are very bonded, so she works well with me because she loves our relationship and everything we do together. But she is basically in charge and has very strong opinions. Her strength of will is common among Mustangs, and can often invite abuse, but Bella had the good fortune to be adopted as a yearling by someone who understood her and worked with her in keeping with her personality.

Corazon on the other hand is unsure of herself, lacks confidence, and “stuffs” her feelings. You often don’t know what she’s thinking or feeling, and her way of dealing with fear or confusion is to freeze up. Turns out she was not so lucky in her life and got passed around a lot, probably because people didn’t understand her. She has some old body problems too, so being asked to work through pain would definitely have contributed to her tendency to shut down occasionally. With consistent praise, constant reassurance, body work and good nutrition, her personality is emerging more and more. Her body is loosening up, and she will now express an opinion or two if you ask her to do something she’s not wild about doing.

Pondering these differences, I wrote Dr. Ward asking her for an opinion on how horses who share the same elements can be so different. Here is her response:

The combination Five Element temperaments are more complicated than the pure types. Each combination temperament has its own characteristics in addition to those contributed from each element. Breed and past experiences will also contribute to a horse’s behavior which can make typing more challenging. Taking the time to figure out your horse’s type allows you to understand why he acts the way he does and anticipate problems before they occur. The horse can’t change who he is but we can change how we interact with him so that being with us feels good.

I love this. It affirms my intuition and supports the different way in which I handle each of my girls. Corazon will continue to get all the encouragement and support she needs to fully realize herself; Bella will continue to be my best friend and to own my heart.

The bonus here is that they are a perfect match as “roommates” because Bella leads and Corazon needs a leader! They bonded instantly when I brought Corazon home last August so, whereas not all horses get along, these two compliment each other and make a perfect team. I adore them both and feel I really lucked out!

Corazon (left) & Bella bonding on their first day.

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